2017-2018 Catalog

Psychology, Bachelor of Arts

Students who earn a bachelor’s degree in psychology may pursue graduate studies, or work in a field where a solid grounding in human behavior is needed. Students focus on areas of particular interest through coursework in various subject areas, including adult or child counseling, Indigenous research, biological psychology, school-based counseling, administration/management, human relations, or law enforcement. Coursework in the BA program draws from multiple academic departments at Salish Kootenai College.

Bachelor of Arts Degree Objectives

The curriculum of the Psychology Bachelor of Arts program is intended to:

  • Provide a generalist degree with coursework across a broad range of subject areas in psychology and other disciplines
  • Train students in a variety of skills, including computer applications, written communication, speaking and presentations, and interpersonal relations
  • Address the educational needs of Tribal College students who live and work in a reservation setting
  • Provide coursework that helps prepare the student to use psychology in a multicultural context, with specific emphasis on Native American cultures and values
  • Increase skills in understanding and applying research methodology using both Western and Indigenous styles of research
  • Offer upper division psychology courses in preparation for graduate studies
  • Offer a broad-based program for careers requiring knowledge and understanding of human behavior.

Student Learning Outcomes

In addition to the Learning Outcomes for the Associate of Arts, upon completion of the Bachelor of Arts degree, students will:

  • Show development of a broad knowledge base in psychology subject areas, including an awareness of ethical issues in the fields of psychology and counseling
  • Develop baccalaureate level skills in psychological writing, public speaking, computer applications and interpersonal communication
  • Demonstrate understanding and application of research methodology as applied to Western and Indigenous styles of research, including use of psychological literature to find, review, understand and keep current in the subject areas of psychology
  • Apply knowledge of psychology to real-world situations in meaningful ways across multiple settings and conditions
  • Continue to develop self-knowledge and its application to interpersonal psychology, including the ability to understand and assess the influence of one’s own perspectives, abilities, strengths and weaknesses
  • Develop flexibility in working within and across cultures by building upon cultural knowledge and awareness
  • Integrate Native American cultural perspectives into knowledge and application of psychology and counseling theory and be able to apply this knowledge to issues, perspectives and situations encountered in a reservation setting

The Bachelor of Arts in Psychology curriculum is organized to serve two general purposes. It is an appropriate degree for students who plan to go to graduate school in Psychology, Counseling , Mental Health, School Counseling , or Law . The curriculum is designed for students who may pursue either a Master’s Degree or a Ph.D.

The degree also serves as a broad-based program for students who want to enter the workforce after earning a Bachelor’s degree. Students may enter psychology fields such as Mental Health or Case Management or non-psychology fields such as Personnel, Human Resources, Administration, Corrections, Law Enforcement, or any field requiring an understanding of human behavior.

The Psychology degree balances psychology course work with coursework in concentration areas of the student’s choice. The concentration area is made up of Focus Electives selected by the student in consultation with their advisor and in pursuit of their educational/career goals. In Focus Courses, students may learn practical skills that are helpful in a variety of careers, such as electronic data management, grant writing, conflict resolution, Native American policy, public presentation, and so on. Students select a total of 9 Focus Elective credits. 

Senior Capstone: All students develop a Senior Capstone project, in which they deeply explore a topic in psychology, while demonstrating and refining their written communication skills. Projects include perspectives related to Indigenous psychology. Format may be a literature review or a small empirical study. The Capstone project culminates in an APA-style paper and formal presentation during spring quarter of the 4th year.

Junior Year Entry

Upon completion of the AA Psychology degree or equivalent AA degree, students may apply to the Bachelor of Arts program. The Junior Year Placement Application helps determine the student’s writing proficiency at time of entry into the BA program, and informs the student of behavioral and professional expectations for upper division psychology students. The Placement Application includes: Completed Application , TABE Writing test scores (current) , Psychology writing proficiency exercise; signed Statement of understanding and willingness to follow guidelines set out in the SKC Psychology Student Conduct Code and Guidelines for Professional Development; and signed Statement of understanding and compliance with SKC Plagiarism Policy.

Requirements:

  • A student must maintain an overall GPA of 2.75 in the upper two years of the psychology program in order to graduate with the Bachelor of Arts degree
  • Students are expected to comply with campus conduct codes as delineated in the SKC Student Handbook and the SKC Psychology Student Conduct Code and Guidelines for Professional Development (see Psychology page of the SKC website)
  • See SKC Catalog Course Descriptions for specific prerequisites
  • A student must maintain a 3.0 in the Writing ­Sequence classes (ENGL 306; SPCH 360 or BUMG 240), and must attain a grade of B in ENGL 306

Curriculum

Fall (Third Year)

PSYC 301Seminar in Upper Division Psychology

1

MEDA 101Introduction to Media Design

5

ENGL 306Writing Research Papers

3

SCWK 203Domestic Violence: Breaking the Cycle of Abuse

2

SCWK 160Introduction to Addiction Studies

3

Total Credit Hours:14

Winter (Third Year)

PSYC 301Seminar in Upper Division Psychology

1

PSYC 315Biological Psychology

5

ELECTIVE Psychology Focus Elective from List

3

ELECTIVE Psychology

3

 

SPCH 360Professional Presentation Skills

3

OR

OFED 240Business Presentations

3

Total Credit Hours:15

Spring (Third Year)

HMNT 301Social and Environmental Ethics

3

MATH 241Statistics

5

PSYC 375Group Process

3

ELECTIVE Native American Studies Advanced General Education from List

3

ELECTIVE Psychology

3

Total Credit Hours:17

See List of Native American Studies electives, below.

Fall (Fourth Year)

PSYC 372Advanced Research Methods in Psychology

3

PSYC 415Counseling Methods

5

PSYC 472Indigenous Research Methodologies in Psychology

5

ELECTIVE (Studio Arts)

3

Total Credit Hours:16

Winter (Fourth Year)

NASD 210Introduction to Indigenous Science

3

PSYC 450Capstone I

3

PSYC 405Exploring Community Networking

1

PSYC 430Diverse Issues in Historical Trauma

3

ELECTIVE NASD (from List)

3

ELECTIVE Psychology Focus Elective from List

3

Total Credit Hours:16

Spring (Fourth Year)

NASD 250History of Federal Indian Policy

5

PSYC 451Capstone II

3

ELECTIVE Open 1 cr

1

ELECTIVE Psychology Focus Elective from List

3

Total Credit Hours:12

Bachelor of Arts NASD CREDITS (6 required; selected from list, or by advisor consent)

EDUC 235Introduction to Indian Education

3

NASD 102Flathead Reservation History Before 1850

3

NASD 103Flathead Reservation History 1850 - 1910

3

NASD 106Pre-European Contact

3

NASD 176Introduction to Traditional Tool Making

3

NASD 215North American Archaeology

3

NASD 225American Indian Education and Federal Policy

3

NASD 252History of Tribal Government on the Flathead Reservation

3

NASD 262Contemporary Issues in American Indian Life

3

NASD 305Native American Women

3

NASD 306Gender and Identity in Indian Country

3

NASD 307Native American Leaders after 1900

3

NASD 308Ethnobotany

3

NASD 310Museum Science and its Applications in Indian Country

3

NASD 320Federal Indian Law

3

NASD 341Principles of Tribal Sovereignty

3

NASD 443Tribal Courts

3

NASL Any Native American Language Course

3

Bachelor of Arts FOCUS CREDITS (9 required; selected from list, or by advisor consent)

Focus courses are selected from the following list in consultation with advisor, according to student educational goals. Additional Upper Division Psychology courses can be used as Focus courses when Psychology electives are completed. 

ARTD 109Self-Expression through the Arts

3

BUMG 220Management and Supervision

3

 

BUMG 257Business Law

3

AND

BUMG 258Business Law Laboratory

1

 

BUMG 302Advanced Management: Leadership

3

BUMG 325Business Law II

3

CAPP 161Electronic Spreadsheets

3

CAPP 162Data Management Systems

3

CDAR 245Multicultural Competency and Ethics in CD

3

CDAR 251Co-Occurring Disorders in CD

3

CDAR 259Chemical Dependency Assessment and Case Management I

3

CDAR 260Chemical Dependency Assessment and Case Management II

3

CDAR 261Treatment Planning & Documentation in CD

3

CDAR 262Chemical Dependency Counseling I

3

CDAR 263Chemical Dependency Counseling II

3

CDAR 264Chemical Dependency Counseling III

3

ECON 410Economic Development on Indian Reservations

3

ECED 100Introduction to Early Childhood Education

2

ECED 325Brain Based Learning and Teaching

3

EDUC 221Parent Partnerships and Community Collaboration

2

EDUC 235Introduction to Indian Education

3

ENGL 107Communication in the Workplace

3

GNSD 350Introduction to Grant Writing

3

OFED 121Human Relations

3

NASD 102Flathead Reservation History Before 1850

3

NASD 103Flathead Reservation History 1850 - 1910

3

NASD 105Indians of Montana

3

NASD 106Pre-European Contact

3

NASD 215North American Archaeology

3

NASD 225American Indian Education and Federal Policy

3

NASD 252History of Tribal Government on the Flathead Reservation

3

NASD 262Contemporary Issues in American Indian Life

3

NASD 271Foundations Of Leadership and Ethics

3

NASD 305Native American Women

3

NASD 306Gender and Identity in Indian Country

3

NASD 307Native American Leaders after 1900

3

NASD 320Federal Indian Law

3

NASD 341Principles of Tribal Sovereignty

3

NASD 415Human Resource Management

3

NASD 441Tribal Health and Wellness

3

NASD 443Tribal Courts

3

SCWK 263Pharmacology of Psychoactive Substances

3

SCWK 470Working with Children and Families at Risk

3

NASD 102, NASD 103, NASD 105, NASD 106, NASD 215, NASD 225, NASD 252, NASD 262, NASD 270, NASD 271, NASD 305, NASD 306, NASD 307, NASD 315, NASD 320, NASD 330, NASD 341, NASD 415, NASD 441, NASD 443: also on NASD B.A. List; can be used for EITHER (but not both) Focus or NASD course.

Total Credit Hours: 184

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